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Posts tagged "Child custody"

An overview of grandparents' rights in Texas

Although there may be a blood relationship between grandparents and their grandchildren, it is important to understand that the rights of grandparents are limited with regard to visitation. The U.S. Supreme Court has ruled that parents' rights are protected in making decisions about their children. However, this does not extend to other interested family members who may want to be involved in the life of a child.

Understanding custody arrangements in Texas

For many families, the most important aspect of the parenting plan may be the custody agreement. The typical custody arrangement most parents are familiar with is called standard possession. These agreements are usually ideal for parents who do not live in close enough proximity to the child's school.

Texas standard possession orders

In the view of Texas courts handling family law matters, allowing a child to develop and maintain good relationships with both parents is considered to be in the child's best interests in most circumstances. When divorcing parents are unable to agree on visitation matters, a judge will grant the noncustodial parent those rights according to a standard possession schedule established by the legislature.

Parenting plans and child custody in Texas

Parents in Texas may benefit from learning more about the laws concerning parenting plans and child custody, as described by the State Bar of Texas. A parenting plan consists of child support, rights to custody, a visitation schedule and other matters involving the child in an effort to minimize disputes. Parenting plans became a required part of the state's final divorce decree in the year 2005. Courts presiding over a divorce proceeding also have the authority to provide adjudication regarding custody rights after the dissolution of the marriage.

What can the courts do to prevent parental child abduction?

Many Texas couples may find it difficult to negotiate a child custody agreement during a divorce. In some cases, one parent may decide to abduct the child and take him or her out of the state or even the country if the case is not going the way that he or she planned or if he or she wishes to hurt the other parent. If there is a risk of international abduction, the court has the authority to reduce the risk by putting certain preventative measures into place.

Missing girl found in Mexico after 12-year disappearance

A Texas girl who was kidnapped by her mother in April 2002 was located in Mexico on Sept. 30. Two years before her disappearance, the girl's parents had finalized a divorce settlement in which the girl's father was granted full child custody. The girl's mother was reportedly spending a weekend with her 4-year-old daughter when the two of them went missing.

Resolving shared parenting issues in child custody cases

Texas law believes that if, as a parent, you are facing divorce, maintaining your children's best interest is vital. This means that your situation may have built-in terms regarding child custody so that both parents are allotted sufficient opportunity to parent. The goal of state law and our office is that children benefit from the best relationship possible with both parents.

Child custody law in Texas

The family law in Texas recognizes the term "child custody" as "conservatorship," and the "custodian" as the "conservator." Unless the parents can agree on shared responsibilities, the court will identify the terms of the conservatorship under all legal rights of both spouses. The ultimate goal is the welfare of a child.

Overview of Texas conservatorship

While most people are familiar with the term "child custody," Texas labels this "conservatorship" and calls parents "conservators" instead of "custodians." When a couple ends their marriage in the state, they should try to work out a custody plan. In the event that this is not possible, a judge will rule on conservatorship and will mainly consider the best interests of the child.

New book examines how and why marriage is changing in the U.S.

In past decades, little girls often grew up dreaming about and planning their wedding day. Today, these idyllic images of a beautiful white dress, bright bouquet of flowers and handsome groom have all but faded for a select segment of the population. While much of the de-emphasis on marriage relates to the fact that women have more opportunities to pursue higher educational degrees and earn decent salaries, a new book provides additional insight into why fewer Americans are choosing to get married.