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Posts tagged "Child support"

How a person can check if they owe child support

Many Texas residents have experienced the joy that comes with parenthood. They also understand that there are a variety of things that can separate families. An individual who has a child but has not been in contact with the child may be interested in finding out if they owe child support.

Ex-wife seeking child support funds from former NFL star

The ex-wife of former NFL star Michael Strahan is demanding that he pay over $500,000 to her to account for back child support and cover their children's horseback lessons. The details of the case might be informative to couples and individuals in Texas. The former couple's twin daughters are accomplished horseback riders, and they are enrolled in some pricey lessons. Strahan's ex-wife claims to have paid $450,802 for the lessons since 2017, and she is demanding half of that figure be reimbursed by Strahan.

When parents paying child support face financial crisis

Parents in Texas want to provide for their children, and child support can be an important part of that picture. Child support payments help to make sure that children are able to maintain a decent lifestyle, and kids whose parents pay support are more likely to stay out of poverty. However, child support determinations are based on parental income. Parents can't pay more than they make, after all. Payments should reflect the income of the parents at the time the order was made, but parents' fortunes can change over time. In particular, parents who fall ill, develop a disability or lose their jobs may face severe financial hardship and be unable to pay their child support bills.

Challenges of paying child support

Many noncustodial parents in Texas may struggle to meet their child support obligations. While the terms "deadbeat dad" and "deadbeat mom" are often used to describe parents who do not pay their child support as ordered in court, they may not always be accurate. In many cases, parents may be struggling with overall financial problems and difficulties rather than seeking to avoid child support specifically. After all, people cannot discharge child support debt in bankruptcy, so the hefty support bills may remain even for people who lose almost everything due to a financial crisis.

How incarceration can impact child support

Parents who owe child support in Texas or any other state could still be liable for making payments while in jail. In some cases, a judge may be willing to review an existing support order before either the custodial or noncustodial parent begins their sentence. An individual could be required to continue making payments according to the original agreement depending on the circumstances in a given matter.

Resolving child support cases in multiple states

There is a possibility that a child support order that was created in Texas will need to be modified in the future. The process of modifying an order may be more complicated if one or both spouses move to another state. Parents who are seeking child support in another state will be guided by the terms of The Uniform Interstate Family Support Act (UIFSA). Typically, the state where the order originates will continue to have jurisdiction over the matter.

The four types of child support cases

The child support system in Texas can be a source of confusion to parents because it is often more complex than they expect it to be. There are four different categories of child support cases, which are based on their status under the Social Security Act of 1975's Title IV. These categories are IV-D cases, non-IV-D cases, IV-A cases and IV-E cases.

Why a support order could be changed

Child support orders issued in Texas or any other state can be modified at a later date if necessary. A parent who seeks to modify an existing child support order will need to show that he or she has experienced a significant change in circumstances. For instance, a parent could claim that a decrease in income makes it difficult to comply with the existing order. Tax returns, pay stubs or other financial records may be used to verify that claim.

How a disability can impact child support payments

Parents in Texas and throughout the country who become disabled may not be able to make their child support payments in full. However, it doesn't mean that their obligation to support their children comes to an end. Those who receive disability benefits may be required to give a portion of that income to the child's other parent.