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Posts tagged "Child custody"

Making co-parenting work during the holiday season

For children in Texas, the holidays can be a time of great excitement and anticipation. If divorce is part of the equation, however, seasonal happenings can also be a source of stress and potential conflict. This is especially true when children have to go back and forth from one parent's home to the other. Whether the end of a marriage is new or not, having a solid co-parenting plan in place during the holidays may effectively ease stress for children and prevent serious disagreements from affecting everyone emotionally.

Substance abuse adds new concerns for children in divorce

Being married to someone with a substance abuse problem in Texas can lead to a number of difficulties, including financial troubles, frequent disagreements and physical altercations. As a result, marriages that involve substance abuse are at a higher risk for divorce. This process is further complicated when children are involved and child safety concerns are raised.

Parallel parenting to avoid conflict after divorce

The ideal situation for divorced parents and their children is one in which the estranged couple can have an amicable and cooperative relationship as co-parents. However, this is not always possible. Research shows that witnessing conflict between their parents is the most damaging element of divorce for children. Texas couples who want to avoid this but who cannot get along may want to consider parallel parenting.

Texas parents might consider nesting for their kids' sake

Since divorce is never easy for anyone involved, some parents have taken to a solution meant to soften the blow for their children. It is called nesting or bird nesting, and the idea focuses around the children staying in the family home while the parents alternate time in and out of the house. Some parents share a small apartment, so when one parent is in the family home with the kids, the other stays in the apartment.

Negotiating child custody and support after a divorce

Texas parents who decide to divorce may wrestle with difficult issues about how to handle possession and access to their children. In many cases, they are able to negotiate an amicable division of parenting time and present it in family court. However, when they have a more difficult or fraught relationship, the situation can easily devolve into a battle over time with the children. Once a judge is forced to rule, both parents may feel as if they are treated unfairly.

Temporary child custody agreements

Parents in Texas who file for divorce may request a temporary hearing shortly after the case is filed so that major issues like temporary child custody and support can be decided. A parent may also consider granting temporary custody to another person if they are temporarily unable to care for a child due to an illness or difficult financial circumstances.

Custody of child citizens worries immigrants facing deportation

Some families in Texas contain citizens and immigrants residing in the country without documentation. The aggressive immigration policies of the Trump administration have increased deportations and forced many parents to find legal guardians for their children who possess citizenship.

Making sure kids are happy after a divorce

Divorce can often involve many intense emotions, but the children who are involved can usually bounce back and live happy lives when their parents focus on their well-being. Despite the personal difficulties they are going through, when parents are sensitive to the needs of their children, they are more likely to give their kids a sense of confidence, security and peace of mind. Parents in Texas can focus on a few key areas when aspiring to reach this goal.

When unmarried parents have child custody issues

Children of unmarried parents have a bit different situation than children whose parents are married. In most cases around the country, an unwed mother who is considered a fit parent will be granted physical custody or as it is dubbed in Texas law, 'possession" of her children. However, a father can act through the courts to establish visitation or 'access" to his children. In child custody and visitation cases across the nation, the courts will always keep the best interests of the child in the forefront of the decision-making process.