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Posts tagged "Child Custody"

How to handle exes who don't pay child support

Divorced parents in Texas can get frustrated when their exes stop paying child support, hence prompting them to withhold visitation rights till child support is paid. However, parents who do bar their exes from seeing their children are placing themselves on the bad side of the law.

Parental rights and divorce

Parents in Texas who are getting divorced might wonder what they can do to ensure that they remain a part of their children's lives. In particular, some fathers may be concerned that they will be regarded as less crucial in the child's life than the mother.

How to get possession of a child in Texas

After many Texas divorces involving parents, it's necessary for exes to determine how they will raise their children. In some cases, a parent will want sole possession of a son or daughter. To start a possession case, a parent will need to speak with the court clerk to learn the rules and procedures in a given jurisdiction.

How parents can resolve disputes regarding their children

In Texas, child custody cases revolve around what is in the best interests of the kids. In some cases, parents won't agree on what that may be. However, it is almost always in the child's best interest for a possession dispute to be resolved in an amicable manner. While a formal trial may be necessary, parents can first try to come to an agreement on their own or through mediation.

Why shared custody is best for children

Parents in Texas who are going through a divorce are concerned about the way it will impact their children. Mothers are often advised to seek sole custody of their children, even when fathers want to be a part of their children's lives. This advice is often thought to be in the best interests of the child.

Making co-parenting work during the holiday season

For children in Texas, the holidays can be a time of great excitement and anticipation. If divorce is part of the equation, however, seasonal happenings can also be a source of stress and potential conflict. This is especially true when children have to go back and forth from one parent's home to the other. Whether the end of a marriage is new or not, having a solid co-parenting plan in place during the holidays may effectively ease stress for children and prevent serious disagreements from affecting everyone emotionally.

Substance abuse adds new concerns for children in divorce

Being married to someone with a substance abuse problem in Texas can lead to a number of difficulties, including financial troubles, frequent disagreements and physical altercations. As a result, marriages that involve substance abuse are at a higher risk for divorce. This process is further complicated when children are involved and child safety concerns are raised.

Parallel parenting to avoid conflict after divorce

The ideal situation for divorced parents and their children is one in which the estranged couple can have an amicable and cooperative relationship as co-parents. However, this is not always possible. Research shows that witnessing conflict between their parents is the most damaging element of divorce for children. Texas couples who want to avoid this but who cannot get along may want to consider parallel parenting.

Texas parents might consider nesting for their kids' sake

Since divorce is never easy for anyone involved, some parents have taken to a solution meant to soften the blow for their children. It is called nesting or bird nesting, and the idea focuses around the children staying in the family home while the parents alternate time in and out of the house. Some parents share a small apartment, so when one parent is in the family home with the kids, the other stays in the apartment.

Negotiating child custody and support after a divorce

Texas parents who decide to divorce may wrestle with difficult issues about how to handle possession and access to their children. In many cases, they are able to negotiate an amicable division of parenting time and present it in family court. However, when they have a more difficult or fraught relationship, the situation can easily devolve into a battle over time with the children. Once a judge is forced to rule, both parents may feel as if they are treated unfairly.