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Child Custody Archives

Witholding visitation over unpaid child support may be unwise

Not receiving court-ordered child support payments in a timely manner can be extremely frustrating for custodial parents in Texas and around the country, but it may be unwise for them to respond by withholding visitation. This is because visitation and custody arrangements are put into place with the best interests of the child in mind, and interfering with them over financial issues could lead to legal problems.

Preparing for a child custody case

When people in Texas get divorced, one of the most difficult issues to resolve can be child custody. An increasing number of family courts favor joint or shared custody whenever possible, and many aim to have both parents agree on a custody solution and develop a parenting plan. However, when the relationship between the parents is more difficult, it can be particularly important for them to be prepared to show important information to protect their relationships with their children. There are some key documents that can be especially crucial to supporting a child custody hearing.

How parents can help their children after divorce

Divorce can be hard on children, and a conflict-ridden divorce in which children feel forced to choose sides can lead to problems that follow them for years. However, this outcome is not inevitable. Parents in Texas who are getting a divorce can take several steps to help their children better adjust.

Factors used in creating parenting plans after a divorce

Determining who gets custody, also called "possession," of a child can be a contentious issue during a divorce in Texas or anywhere else. While the parents may be able to work out a parenting plan on their own, a judge may need to make a final ruling. The ruling is based on what is determined to be in the best interest of the children. There are many different factors that could be used when deciding what benefits the child the most.

How co-parenting can change in the teen years

Even for estranged Texas couples who have successfully co-parented for years after a divorce, new challenges may come along once their children are teenagers. It is important that parents do not relax their communication with one another or with their child at this time even as their teen becomes more mature and takes on more responsibilities.

Making a plan for summer co-parenting

Parents in Texas who decide to divorce can face some unique challenges in the summer as they develop their co-parenting relationship. The busy schedule of school and extracurricular activities can help to keep kids' lives relatively consistent, even as they move back and forth between their parents' homes. However, while summertime can be a period for additional fun and adventure, it can also be a period of changes for parents and their children. There are some things that divorced parents can keep in mind to help their summers remain positive and enjoyable experiences for the kids.

Co-parenting with teens

Parenting a teen can be challenging under any circumstances. However, Texas parents who are divorced may have to adapt to a number of changes. As teens are testing their new independence, exes who have been co-parenting for a long time may feel that they can finally ease up, but this is not the time for too much freedom. Failing to communicate effectively is one of the mistakes divorced parents make when co-parenting teens.

The various rights given to divorced parents

Most Texas parents who are divorced still have rights to their children. In some cases, one parent will be given sole legal or physical possession while the other is given access rights. However, it's also possible that parents will share possession in an effort to protect the child's best interests. Legal possession allows a parent to make important decisions, such as what religion a son or daughter is exposed to.