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Making a plan for summer co-parenting

Parents in Texas who decide to divorce can face some unique challenges in the summer as they develop their co-parenting relationship. The busy schedule of school and extracurricular activities can help to keep kids' lives relatively consistent, even as they move back and forth between their parents' homes. However, while summertime can be a period for additional fun and adventure, it can also be a period of changes for parents and their children. There are some things that divorced parents can keep in mind to help their summers remain positive and enjoyable experiences for the kids.

Communication is always important to co-parenting, and this remains true in the summer. Conflicts over summer plans and schedules can often be avoided when parents share information with each other early enough to come to an agreement. Shared online calendars or posted schedules can also help kids be prepared for upcoming plans. In addition, it is important that parents keep their children out of their disputes. After a divorce, children continue to love both of their parents, absent a situation of neglect or abuse. Both parents have the responsibility to support their child's relationship with the other parent and to avoid negative talk or complaints about the other parent.

The summer may also be a time to revisit parenting plans made earlier on. This is especially true as children grow. Older kids will want to have time not only with both parents, but with their friends or focusing on key activities. Parents should aim to support their kids' experiences and be flexible in order to make that happen.

When parents divorce, they enter a new, more complicated stage of parenting together. A family law attorney might be able to work with a divorcing parent to advocate for the children and reach a fair settlement on child custody and visitation.

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